The Front Page

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






  After the gruesome action of Friday night wrestling, I was looking forward to a night of comedy and drama by the ensemble of upper school students set to take the stage as a part of the production FRONT PAGE by Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur. As the curtain rose, we were taken back to the time, to the fast pace world of 1920s journalism. The core group of reporters was played by Jay Gonya, Eric Scherer,  Jane Sartwell, Helena Ware, Nick Devinne, Alex Wienner, and Alex Pritchett. The rapport and humor between these 7 kept the audience laughing and also on the edge of their seats, trying to grasp every detail of the story. On the day the play takes place, Earl Williams, played by Ben Miller, is set to hang. The journalists all joke and play cards while the noose is being prepared below them in the street. Each of the 7 actors brought substance and purpose to their characters, adding a certain glimmer of personality and making them stand out from the rest. For example, Alex Pritchett gave a funny and believable portrayal of the outcast of the group. His constant complaining and morose attitude kept him singular among the rest of his coworkers. Toward the end of the first act we are introduced to Hildy, played by Tristin Goodenough. Hildy is a journalist who has just recently quit her job at the newspaper to run away to New York with her fiance (Chase Andre). Tristin’s portrayal of Hildy, a part that was in the original screenplay cast as a man, was as funny as it was inspiring. Hildy is a no nonsense woman, who works hard and isn’t afraid to speak her mind. Tristin brought an attitude and wit to the character that made me count down the minutes until she returned to the stage. In the first act we are also introduced to Molly, Earl Williams love interest, played by Maggie Giblin. Molly is ridiculed by the reporters when she stops by, both for the way she looks and for her profession as a prostitute. Although Maggie is small, she always manages to triple in size the moment she steps on the stage. Her big personality and comedic time always stand out giving way to perfect character portrayals. Of course, I cannot talk about Maggie’s performance without mentioning that spot on Brooklyn accent. Speaking of accents, props must also be given to Penn Hoen on his hilariously realistic German accent. The play also featured superb acting by Nate Vandiver, Wes Culp, Amanda Madsen, Jake Present, and of course, the always amazing Eli Henslee, who managed to have everyone rolling on the floor laughing with his performance as Walter Burns. To those who missed out on the play this year, I regret to inform you that you missed the steamiest kiss off all time (looking at you Eli and Chase). A huge congratulations to the cast, crew, and director Andie Gasparovic for pulling off a truly amazing production. Bravo.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • The Front Page

    Top Stories

    Latin Students Visit Greece

  • The Front Page

    Top Stories

    Snow Day Decisions

  • The Front Page

    Top Stories

    Inside the Senior Gift Committee

  • Community

    Strategic Planning at Friends

  • The Front Page

    Top Stories

    Language and Culture: Friends School Students in Spain

  • The Front Page

    Top Stories

    New Planets Discovered

  • Arts and Culture

    Fresh Music Scene at Friends

  • The Front Page

    Top Stories

    La La Land Wins Big

  • The Front Page

    Top Stories

    The Guacamole Tax

  • The Front Page

    Top Stories

    Trump’s Executive Orders

The Front Page